Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion (ed. Ronald Numbers)

Ex-evangelicals, like myself, have seen just about every possible way evangelicals, and religious people in general, can misuse and abuse science and history.  Some of these are infamous:  young earth creationism and conversion therapy come to mind.  But sometimes we’ve been over-exposed – or more accurately, unevenly exposed.  It can be easy to forget, in … Continue reading Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion (ed. Ronald Numbers)

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March (Geraldine Brooks)

I’ve reviewed several of Geraldine Brooks’ novels on my blog, and have enjoyed them all, so I decided it was time to try March (her only novel to win a Pulitzer). You could describe March as a spin-off of Little Women.  Sort of.  It would be radically unfair, though, because “spin-off” tends to bring to … Continue reading March (Geraldine Brooks)

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (Rebecca Skloot)

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks has a lot in common with Killers of the Flower Moon.  Both are fascinating pieces of on-the-ground journalism about events that happened decades ago;  both Grann and Skloot worked extensively with living family members of the people involved, and helped solved mysteries the family members never had answers to.  … Continue reading The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (Rebecca Skloot)

Koh-i-Noor: The History of the World’s Most Infamous Diamond (William Dalrymple and Anita Anand)

I almost bought this book in England last summer, but it only came in hardcover and my suitcase was getting too fat as it was.  Turns out my local library had it for free.  Which makes this the first time I’ve checked out a book from the gemology section. If you didn’t already know, the … Continue reading Koh-i-Noor: The History of the World’s Most Infamous Diamond (William Dalrymple and Anita Anand)